Notable, relevant and reliably-sourced information and authoritative quotes were repeatedly deleted by the two academic authors of Wikipedia's archaeoastronomy article whenever in conflict with their beliefs.
 
Fringe Archaeoastronomy appearing March 31 - April 9, 2008 (March 24 - 31 prior version concluded @ note 5)
"At least now we have all the archaeological facts to go along with the astronomers, the Druids, the Flat Earthers and all the rest."[1]
Archaeoastronomy owes something of this poor reputation among scholars to its occasional misuse to advance pseudo-historical accounts of the antiquity of certain cultures in certain regions. Since the Nineteenth Century numerous scholars have sought to use archaeoastronomical calculations to demonstrate the antiquity of Ancient Indian Vedic culture, computing the dates of astronomical observations ambiguously described in ancient poetry to as early as 4000 BCE.[2] David Pingree, a historian of Indian astronomy, condemned "the scholars who perpetrate wild theories of prehistoric science and call themselves archaeoastronomers."[3]
 
Another example was the attempt by Gallagher,[4] to interpret inscriptions in West Virginia as a description in Celtic Ogham alphabet of the supposed winter solstitial marker at the site. The controversial translation was supposedly validated by a problematic archaeoastronomical indication in which the winter solstice sun shone on an inscription of the sun at the site. Subsequent analyses demonstrated the weakness of the claimed solstitial marker.[5] Nearly concurrent with Gallagher's 1983 claim, precision sunrise and sunset solar alignments upon petroglyphs inscribed with possible Ogham were identified in mid-America.[6] CBS News documented observations made in Colorado and Oklahoma on 1987's vernal equinox.[7] The delineation between mainstream and fringe archaeoastronomy may not be as distinct or as certain as determined by archaeology's common litmus test,[8] i.e. nearly all evidence favoring Pre-Columbian trans-oceanic contact is dismissed as ''fringe''.[9] An American archaeologist actually trained to recognize Old World scripts is University of Calgary Department of Archaeology Professor Emeritus David H. Kelley who believes the dilemma centers on exactly what constitutes acceptable evidence:
The problem is in the fact that there are influences, but they don't show up in 'dirt archaeology.' Basically, they show up in ideological materials: mythology, astronomy, calendrics. These are precisely the areas which are hardest to deal with archaeologically. And so they don't get much attention from traditional archaeologists.[10]

Fringe Archaeoastronomy appearing April 9 - 27, 2008 - difference @ line 183 (zero tolerance for any balance)
"At least now we have all the archaeological facts to go along with the astronomers, the Druids, the Flat Earthers and all the rest."[1]
Archaeoastronomy owes something of this poor reputation among scholars to its occasional misuse to advance pseudo-historical accounts of the antiquity of certain cultures in certain regions. Since the Nineteenth Century numerous scholars have sought to use archaeoastronomical calculations to demonstrate the antiquity of Ancient Indian Vedic culture, computing the dates of astronomical observations ambiguously described in ancient poetry to as early as 4000 BCE.[2] David Pingree, a historian of Indian astronomy, condemned "the scholars who perpetrate wild theories of prehistoric science and call themselves archaeoastronomers."[3]
 
Another example was the attempt by Gallagher,[4] Pyle,[11] and Fell[12] to interpret inscriptions in West Virginia as a description in Celtic Ogham alphabet of the supposed winter solstitial marker at the site. The controversial translation was supposedly validated by a problematic archaeoastronomical indication in which the winter solstice sun shone on an inscription of the sun at the site. Subsequent analyses criticized its cultural inappropriateness, as well as its linguistic and archeaoastronomical[5] claims, to describe it as an example of "cult archaeology."[13]
 
Notes  (abridged and renumbered for simplicity)
1. Sir Jocelyn Stephens quoted in The Times, July 8, 1994, 8.
2. Witzel, M. (May 2001), "Autochthenous Aryans? The Evidence from Old Indian and Iranian Text", Electronic Journal of Vedic Studies 7:3: §28-30.
3. Pingree, D. (1982). "Hellenophilia versus the History of Science". Isis 83: 554-563. reprinted in Michael H. Shank, ed., The Scientific Enterprise in Antiquity and the Middle Ages (Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Pr., 2000), pp. 30-39.
4. Gallagher, I.J. (1983). "Light Dawns on West Virginia History". Wonderful West Virginia 47: 7-11.
5. Wise, R.B. (2003). Observations of the 2002 Winter Solstice at Luther Elkins Petroglyph (46 Wm 3). Council for West Virginia Archaeology.
6. McGlone, W.R. and Leonard, P.M. (1987). Ancient Celtic America. Panorama West Books. ISBN 0-914330-90-X.
7. McNamara, B. (1987). Evening News with Dan Rather, March 23, 1987. CBS News.
8. Fortune, J. (2002). Stone Age Columbus - transcript. BBC.
9. Lemonick, M. and Dorfman, A. (2006). Who Were the First Americans? TIME.
10. Stengel, M. (2000). The Diffusionists Have Landed. The Atlantic.
11. Pyle, R.L. (1983). "A Message from the Past". Wonderful West Virginia (47): 3-6.
12. Fell, B. (1983). "Christian Messages in Old Irish Script Deciphered from Rock Carvings in W. Va.". Wonderful West Virginia (47) 12-19.
13. Lesser, W.H. (1983) "Cult Archaeology Strikes Again: A Case for Pre-Columbian Irishmen in the Mountain State?". West Virginia Archaeologist 35: 48-52.

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