The two academic authors of Wikipedia's archaeoastronomy article insist only the written thoughts of the credentialled matter; linking a science's genesis to a reasonably relevant historical movement is forbidden.
 
History of archaeoastronomy appearing April 9, 2008 (academic opinions that disagree only confuse readers)
"In his short history of 'Astro-archaeology' John Michell argued that the status of research into ancient astronomy had improved over the past two centuries, going 'from lunacy to heresy to interesting notion and finally to the gates of orthodoxy.' Nearly two decades later, we can still ask the question: Is archaeoastronomy still waiting at the gates of orthodoxy or has it gotten inside the gates?" [1]
The term archaeoastronomy was first used by Chesley Baity (at the suggestion of Euan MacKie) in 1973,[2] but as a topic of study it may much older, depending on what you say is archaeoastronomy. Clive Ruggles[3] says that Heinrich Nissen, working in the mid-nineteenth century was arguably the first archaeoastronomer. Rolf Sinclair[4] says that Norman Lockyer, working around the late 19th and early 20th Centuries could be called the 'father of archaeoastronomy.' Euan MacKie[5] would place the origin even later, stating: "...the genesis and modern flowering of archaeoastronomy must surely lie in the work of Alexander Thom in Britain between the 1930s and the 1970s.
 
History of archaeoastronomy appearing for 6 hours on April 10, 2008 (one author erased, the other replaced)
"In his short history of 'Astro-archaeology' John Michell argued that the status of research into ancient astronomy had improved over the past two centuries, going 'from lunacy to heresy to interesting notion and finally to the gates of orthodoxy.' Nearly two decades later, we can still ask the question: Is archaeoastronomy still waiting at the gates of orthodoxy or has it gotten inside the gates?" [1]
In 1777, two hundred years before Michell wrote the above, there were no archaeoastronomers and there were no archaeologists, but there were astronomers and antiquarians.
 
The Great Pyramid of Giza (a.k.a. Kheops or Khufu) near Cairo, Egypt, constructed ~2570 BC, world's tallest building until 1300 CE.And way back in 1646 when Oxford professor of astronomy John Greaves published on his Egyptian pyramid surveys, no one imagined Great Britain would wrestle over the Great Pyramid two centuries later in a fractious, nationalistic debate enduring decades.[6] The French metric system was threatening to replace familiar English measures in the late 1800's. So when Scotland's Astronomer Royal Charles Piazzi Smyth surveyed the Great Pyramid and determined the British inch to be all but identical to the pyramid inch, traditional Britain seemed relieved and vindicated. Yet the belief by Piazzi Smyth and others that this measurement was decreed by God shocked science into a reformation of sorts. Astronomer Richard Anthony Proctor, a prolific author and international lecturer, blasted Piazzi Smyth's thesis in his 1883 book ''The Great Pyramid: Observatory, Tomb and Temple''.[7] Proctor quoted from Plato's Timaeus:
For we learn from Proclus that the pyramids of Egypt (which, according to Diodorus, had existed 3,600 years before his history was written, about 8 B.C.) terminated above in a platform, from which priests made their celestial observations.
Astronomy had matured and was on the verge of diversifying. Great Britain's metrology debate was a catalyst for novel scientific specialties as the antiquarian age was drawing to a close.

 
The term archaeoastronomy was first used by Chesley Baity (and continuing the April 9 paragraph above)
 
History of archaeoastronomy appearing April 10 - 18, 2008 (only minor revisions since then)
"In his short history of 'Astro-archaeology' John Michell argued that the status of research into ancient astronomy had improved over the past two centuries, going 'from lunacy to heresy to interesting notion and finally to the gates of orthodoxy.' Nearly two decades later, we can still ask the question: Is archaeoastronomy still waiting at the gates of orthodoxy or has it gotten inside the gates?" [1]
Two hundred years before Michell wrote the above, there were no archaeoastronomers and there were no professional archaeologists, but there were astronomers and antiquarians. Some of these are considered the precursors of archaeoastronomy, as antiquarians interpreted the astronomical orientation of the ruins that dotted the English countryside, as William Stukeley did of Stonehenge in 1740,[8] while John Aubrey in 1678[9] and Henry Chauncy in 1700 sought similar astronomical principles underlying the orientation of churches.[10] Late in the nineteenth century astronomers such as Richard Proctor and Charles Piazzi Smyth investigated the astronomical orientations of the pyramids.[8]
 
The term archaeoastronomy was first used by Elizabeth Chesley Baity (and continuing the April 9 paragraph above)
 
Notes  (abridged and renumbered for simplicity)
1. Bostwick, T.W. (2006). "Archaeoastronomy at the Gates of Orthodoxy: Introduction to the Oxford VII Conference on Archaeoastronomy Papers", in Todd W. Bostwick and Bryan Bates: Viewing the Sky Through Past and Present Cultures: Selected Papers from the Oxford VII International Conference on Archaeoastronomy, Pueblo Grande Museum Anthropological Papers 15. City of Phoenix Parks and Recreation Department, 1-10. ISBN 1-882572-38-6
2. Sinclair, R.M. (2006). "The Nature of Archaeoastronomy", in Todd W. Bostwick and Bryan Bates: Viewing the Sky Through Past and Present Cultures: Selected Papers from the Oxford VII International Conference on Archaeoastronomy, Pueblo Grande Museum Anthropological Papers 15. City of Phoenix Parks and Recreation Department, 13-26. ISBN 1-882572-38-6.
3. Ruggles, C.L.N. (2005). Ancient Astronomy ABC-Clio. ISBN 1-85109-477-6
4. Sinclair, R.M. (2006). "The Nature of Archaeoastronomy", in Todd W. Bostwick and Bryan Bates: Viewing the Sky Through Past and Present Cultures: Selected Papers from the Oxford VII International Conference on Archaeoastronomy, Pueblo Grande Museum Anthropological Papers 15. City of Phoenix Parks and Recreation Department, 13-26. ISBN 1-882572-38-6.
5. MacKie, E. (2006). "New Evidence for a Professional Priesthood in the European Early Bronze Age", in Todd W. Bostwick and Bryan Bates: Viewing the Sky Through Past and Present Cultures: Selected Papers from the Oxford VII International Conference on Archaeoastronomy, Pueblo Grande Museum Anthropological Papers 15. City of Phoenix Parks and Recreation Department, 343-362. ISBN 1-882572-38-6
6. Reisenauer, E.M. (2003). "The battle of the standards: great pyramid metrology and British identity, 1859-1890". Historian - Albuquerque then Allentown- 65:4:931-979. Michigan State University Press.
7. Proctor, R.A. (1883). The Great Pyramid: Observatory, Tomb and Temple. R. Worthington, New York, NY.
8. Michell, J. (2001). A Little History of Astro-Archaeology. Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0500275572
9. Johnson, W. (1912). Byways of British Archaeology. Cambridge University Press.
10. Hoskin, M. (2001). Tombs, Temples, and Their Orientations: A New Perspective on Mediterranean Prehistory. Ocarina Books. ISBN 0-9540867-1-6.
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how Wikipedia's archaeoastronomy article was hijacked | sanitizing history | muzzling dissent | sanctifying archaeology
The Great Pyramid of Giza (a.k.a. Kheops or Khufu) near Cairo, Egypt, constructed ~2570 BC, world's tallest building until 1300 CE. Enlarge The Great Pyramid